Fronting for discount car insurance: parents don’t know legality

A new study has shown that while many parents may engage in ‘fronting’ – insuring a child’s car in their own name and then naming their son or daughter as a second driver in order to get discount car insurance – many don’t know the practice is illegal.

According to one car insurance comparison site’s newest research study, 55 per cent of drivers are unaware that engaging in fronting breaks the law.  Online car insurance comparison site Moneysupermarket.com’s insurance expert Peter Harrison stated that he was deeply worried about the number of people taking the risk by engaging in fronting.

Mr Harrison explained that while fronting may result in a way to save money in the short-term, the benefits simply are not worth the risks.  Mr Harrison stated that there can be serious consequences if either the parents or the young motorists are found out because it can invalidate their motor car insurance. The insurance expert added that further results could see a younger motorists being brought up on charges of driving whilst uninsured.

Mr Harrison’s warning comes as the Government introduces new legislation designed to crack down on offenders. Official figures make the suggestion that for every 20 motorists on the road today, one of them is driving without insurance cover.  This can add about £30 a year to honest drivers’ insurance premiums.

Divers of uninsured vehicles can now expect to have their car clamped in their driveway when the new rules go into effect this June.  Moreover repeat offenders could see their car seized or even destroyed as a result.

Called Continuance Insurance Enforcement, the new system makes it illegal to possess an uninsured vehicle unless a Statutory Off Road Notification being filed with the appropriate authorities.

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